Discover: Signals by Jameson Nathan Jones (Interview+Review)


Here's where Instagram tags can do wonders, the video below was suggested to me on my feed and autoplayed. Now I will admit, when it comes to modular synthesisers, the equipment, and indeed the music, I know very little. What I can say without a doubt is that something in the tones I was hearing hooked me and resonated deep inside of me on a level I haven't felt in a while. I instantly felt the need to share this masterful album with you all.

Jameson joins us for an interview about his music and I have also included a review.


The video that instantly hooked me on his music:

"Not just an atmospheric pad machine. The Iridium can get downright nasty in some wonderful ways..

Using a couple S&H lfos to rhythmically modulate a gnarly wavetable. The 2nd oscillator is sampling a very clean cello part from one of my albums. Oscillator 3 brings in a granular variation of that same cello sample. I love the way certain filter models drive the signal in very hard, and overload the filter past the point of distortion. Add a little (or a lot) of the digital former post filter and you have one filthy machine." - Jameson's description on Instagram


Play the album as you read to soak up the beautiful atmospherics and relate to the words of the article.

Interview


Q. What is the emotional and or story telling concept being told in Signals as it seems to be an incredibly deep piece or artistic expression?


A. 'Signals' is a collection of electronic-based improvisations. Many of the tracks were in collaboration with the popular Youtube urban explorers, The Proper People. They used some of my music in their videos, and I reached out to them to see if they wanted to provide some footage to accompany some new pieces. They were kind enough to agree, and thus, the album was heavily influenced by the beautiful imperfections of the abandoned places they explore.


As you were music video:


Q. Am I correct in that this is your first release focusing mainly on synthesises, electronics, etc and what made you chose to release this album?


A. While I've used synths and electronics quite a bit in past releases, most of my previous work is more of a hybrid, modern classical blend of electronics with organic instruments. All my training is Classical, so synths are something I've just gotten into in the past 4-5 years. As I fall farther and farther down that rabbit hole, I've been enjoying relying on them more and more. It's been a refreshing departure from my previous work.

Q. You clearly have a deep passion for music that resonates within your work, can you tell us how you became involved in music and what it means to you to be able to create the different styles of music that you do?


A. I started studying piano at the age of 8, so I can't really remember a time when music wasn't a major part of my life. As I mentioned, I was really just in the Classical world all the way through my university years. I began studying composition while still in college, and then after I graduated I started to get into recording, production, and scoring to picture.


Q. I have also discovered your unbelievably beautiful track ‘What dreams may come true’ can you tell us the story behind this piece of music and what your inspiration was.


A. My track 'What Dreams May Come' was the title track from my first full length album (2017). That was also the first album in which I started using hardware synths, so it taught me a lot about making music in that way. There are still a lot of modern classical elements, with quite a bit of piano and a string quartet appearing on several of the tracks, but I think I was already breaking out of that mold a bit and going in some unexpected directions. 


'What dreams may come' Video: